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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Asymmetric Secondary Buckling in Monosymmetric Sandwich Struts

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Ahmer Wadee

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK

L. A. Simões da Silva

Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Universidade de Coimbra Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290 Coimbra, Portugal

J. Appl. Mech 72(5), 683-690 (Dec 03, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1979513 History: Received March 19, 2004; Revised December 03, 2004

An interactive buckling model for sandwich struts accounting for buckle pattern localization is extended to cover such struts with differing face plate thicknesses. Although this does not affect the critical buckling characteristics of the structure, there is a significant change in the postbuckling behavior; formerly symmetric secondary buckling and imperfection sensitivity characteristics lose this quality as both become asymmetric.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The sandwich strut and its cross section. The face plates can have different thicknesses (tb and tt) and that the distance from the top face plate to the neutral axis is y¯. Note that the load P is applied at the neutral axis of the strut.

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Figure 2

Typical load P vs end-shortening E equilibrium diagram for sandwich struts: (a) fundamental path; (b) critical path of overall buckling; (c) secondary path of localized buckling; (d) typical imperfect structure equilibrium path

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Figure 3

Sway and tilt components of overall mode

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Figure 4

Displacement functions used to model localized buckling

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Figure 5

Stress-relieved state of the strut, after Thompson and Hunt (see Ref. 20)

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Figure 6

Relative proximity of secondary and critical bifurcations for struts with different cores and monosymmetries

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Figure 7

The selected strut: definitions of the thicknesses tt, tb, monosymmetry parameter τ, and the sign of overall buckling qs

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Figure 8

Postbuckling profiles of monosymmetric strut with face thicknesses 1.0 and 0.8mm. Other dimensions and properties: L=508mm, b=50.8mm, Ec=50N∕mm2, and νc=0.2.

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Figure 9

Postbuckling equilibrium diagrams of monosymmetric strut with face thicknesses 1.0 and 0.8mm. Other dimensions and properties: L=508mm, b=50.8mm, Ec=50N∕mm2, and νc=0.2.

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Figure 10

Imperfection sensitivity curves for periodic and localized geometric imperfections for the monosymmetric strut with thicknesses 1.0 and 0.8mm; in this case the thinner face is much more sensitive

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Figure 11

Initial imperfection profiles for periodic and worst case localized geometric imperfections for the monosymmetric strut with tt=0.8mm and tb=1.0mm, i.e., the thicker face buckles (qs<0)

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Figure 12

Initial imperfection profiles for periodic and worst case localized geometric imperfections for the monosymmetric strut with tt=1.0mm and tb=0.8mm, i.e., the thinner face buckles locally (qs>0)

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