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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamic Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis Using Boundary Finite Element Method–Finite Element Method

[+] Author and Article Information
S. C. Fan1

Protective Technology Research Center, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798cfansc@ntu.edu.sg

S. M. Li, G. Y. Yu

Protective Technology Research Center, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Appl. Mech 72(4), 591-598 (Aug 20, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1940664 History: Received December 09, 2002; Revised August 20, 2004

In this paper, the boundary finite element method (BFEM) is applied to dynamic fluid-structure interaction problems. The BFEM is employed to model the infinite fluid medium, while the structure is modeled by the finite element method (FEM). The relationship between the fluid pressure and the fluid velocity corresponding to the scattered wave is derived from the acoustic modeling. The BFEM is suitable for both finite and infinite domains, and it has advantages over other numerical methods. The resulting system of equations is symmetric and has no singularity problems. Two numerical examples are presented to validate the accuracy and efficiency of BFEM-FEM coupling for fluid-structure interaction problems.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Sectorial discretization of an unbounded domain and (b) a typical BEFM element with differential width w lying on the boundary of a semi-infinite domain

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Figure 2

A cylindrical cavity subjected to a suddenly applied acceleration

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Figure 3

Pressure of the cavity boundary

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Figure 4

Geometry of a long cylindrical shell subjected to an internal pressure

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Figure 5

Loading conditions for a cylindrical shell

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Figure 6

Matching discretization meshes for the cylinder and the fluid boundary

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Figure 7

Dynamic response of a cylindrical shell

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Figure 8

Geometry of an infinite cylinder

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Figure 9

Radial velocity of a cylinder

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Figure 10

Comparison of results obtained from two Newmark schemes

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Figure 11

Convergence studies using 8, 16, and 32 elements

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