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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Aeroelastic Flutter Mechanisms of a Flexible Disk Rotating in an Enclosed Compressible Fluid

[+] Author and Article Information
Namcheol Kang, Arvind Raman

  School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907

J. Appl. Mech 71(1), 120-130 (Mar 17, 2004) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1631034 History: Received February 11, 2003; Revised June 04, 2003; Online March 17, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Renshaw,  A. A., D’Angelo,  C., and Mote,  C. D., 1994, “Aeroelastically Excited Vibration of a Rotating Disk,” J. Sound Vib., 177(5), pp. 577–590.
Hansen,  M. H., Raman,  A., and Mote,  C. D., 2001, “Estimation of Nonconservative Aerodynamic Pressure Leading to Flutter of Spinning Disks,” J. Fluids Struct., 15, pp. 39–57.
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Kim,  B. C., Raman,  A., and Mote,  C. D., 2000, “Prediction of Aeroelastic Flutter in a Hard Disk Drive,” J. Sound Vib., 238(2), pp. 309–325.
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Huang,  F. Y., and Mote,  C. D., 1996, “Mathematical Analysis of Stability of a Spinning Disk Under Rotating, Arbitrarily Large Damping Forces,” ASME J. Vibr. Acoust., 118, pp. 657–662.
Naganathan,  G., Ramadhayani,  S., and Bajaj,  A. K., 2003, “Numerical Simulations of Flutter Instability of a Flexible Disk Rotating Close to a Rigid Wall,” J. Vib. Control, 9(1), pp. 95–118.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
A schematic diagram of the rotating disk in an enclosed compressible, inviscid fluid
Grahic Jump Location
Convergence characteristics of the two nodal diameter mode at supercritical speed (40,000 rpm). Each N corresponds to use of 2(N+2N2) basis functions in the discretization.
Grahic Jump Location
Coupled natural frequencies as a function of nondimensional cavity length, l, of the axisymmetric acoustic-structural modes of the stationary disk in a cylindrical acoustic cavity
Grahic Jump Location
Coupled natural frequencies as a function of nondimensional cavity length, l, of the asymmetric acoustic-structural modes of the stationary disk in a cylindrical acoustic cavity. Note that all frequencies are repeated due to the axisymmetry of the domain.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed of the natural frequencies of axisymmetric modes of the coupled rotating disk, acoustic cavity system. System parameters are listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation (solid line: coupled freq., dashed line: uncoupled freq.).
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed (0<Ω<150) of the natural frequencies of axisymmetric modes of the coupled rotating disk, acoustic cavity system. This computation is performed for the undamped system, with system parameters listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed (0<Ω<1000) of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues of axisymmetric modes of the coupled rotating disk, acoustic cavity system. This computation is performed for the undamped system, with system parameters listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation of nondimensional flutter speed with Λ and C. These instability regions are plotted for the undamped system where η=0 and zA=infinity.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed (0<Ω<700) of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues of three nodal diameter modes of the coupled rotating disk, acoustic cavity system in the presence of acoustic damping alone induced by sound absorbing wall (zA=4.78×105). System parameters listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed (0<Ω<700) of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues of three nodal diameter modes of the coupled rotating disk, acoustic cavity system in the presence of disk damping alone induced by viscoelastic disk material (η=1.766×10−3). System parameters listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation with nondimensional speed (0<Ω<300) of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues of three nodal diameter modes in co-rotating frame, of the system in the presence of disk damping alone induced by viscoelastic disk material (η=1.766×10−3). System parameters listed in Table 1 and a cavity depth of 1 cm is chosen for the computation.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation of nondimensional flutter speed with Λ and C. These instability regions are plotted for the case of η=1.766×10−3 and zA=infinity.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation of nondimensional flutter speed with the nondimensional ratio of disk to acoustic damping zAη. These instability regions are plotted for zA=4.78×105.
Grahic Jump Location
Variation of nondimensional flutter speed with Λ and C in the presence of both acoustic and disk damping. These instability regions are plotted for the case of zA*=15×106 and η*=3.2×10−6 (in a, b), and η*=3.2×10−12 in (c,d). (a) and (b) correspond to a system where disk damping dominates acoustic damping while (c) and (d) correspond to a situation where acoustic damping effects are dominant.

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