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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Method for Particle Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Z. Zhang, A. Prosperetti

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218

J. Appl. Mech 70(1), 64-74 (Jan 23, 2003) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1530636 History: Received December 04, 2001; Revised March 26, 2002; Online January 23, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Glowinski,  R., Pan,  T. W., Hesla,  T. I., and Joseph,  D. D., 1999, “A Distributed Lagrange Multiplier/Fictitious Domain Method for Particulate Flows,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 25, pp. 755–794.
Patankar,  N. A., Singh,  P., Joseph,  D. D., Glowinski,  R., and Pan,  T.-W., 2000, “A New Formulation of the Distributed Lagrange Multiplier/Fictitious Domain Method for Particulate Flows,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 26, pp. 1509–1524.
Singh, P., Hesla, T. I., and Joseph, D. D., 2001, “Modified Distributed Lagrangian Multiplier/Fictitious Domain Method for Particulate Flows With Collisions,” preprint.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Example of cage around a particle: crosses: pressure nodes; diamonds: vorticity nodes; arrows: velocity nodes
Grahic Jump Location
Two particles falling (left to right) between two parallel plates separated by four particle diameters with final Reynolds numbers of 1.03 (dotted line and squares) and 8.33 (continuous line and crosses). The lines are the present results and the symbols the results of Ref. 6.
Grahic Jump Location
Vertical velocity versus time for two particles aligned vertically and released: while the distance is large enough the fall velocity is nearly equal. As the upper particle gets caught in the wake of the lower one it accelerates (drafting); the two particles interact (kissing), until they tumble and separate. The calculation shown on the left was done with 19.2 nodes per particle diameter, that on the right with 28.8 (courtesy of Prof. T. W. Pan, University of Houston).
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Position versus time for the two particles of the previous figure as calculated with the finer discretization (courtesy of Prof. T. W. Pan, University of Houston)
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Snapshots of the two falling cylinders of Figs. 6 and 7 at times t=1.312, 2.272, 2.521, and 2.971 s as given by the present method
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Vertical (left) and horizontal (right) velocity versus time for the two particles of Fig. 3 as computed by the present method with Δt=1 ms
Grahic Jump Location
Vertical (left) and horizontal (right) position versus time for the two particles of Fig. 4 as computed by the present method with Δt=1 ms
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Fall of a cluster of ten particles as computed with the present method at νt/a=0, 3.0, and 4.0
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Continuation of the previous figure showing the ten falling particles at νt/a=5.0, 6.0, and 6.62. The terminal velocity of the leading particle (No. 10) corresponds to Re≃14, while the maximum Re reached in the simulation is about 17.
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Dimensionless force component aFx/4πμν in the direction of the flow versus time at Re=30 in dependence of the number Nc of modes retained in the summations in (6), (9), and (10); the number of points per cylinder diameter is NΔ=40
Grahic Jump Location
Dimensionless force component aFx/4πμν in the direction of the flow versus time at Re=30 in dependence of the number of points per cylinder diameter; the number of modes is Nc=4
Grahic Jump Location
Vertical velocity of the leading particle for the simulation of Fig. 5 as computed with Δt=0.5, 1, and 2 ms

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