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Special Section: Computational Fluid Mechanics and Fluid–Structure Interaction

Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of Spacecraft Parachutes for Simulation-Based Design

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenji Takizawa, Timothy Spielman, Creighton Moorman, Tayfun E. Tezduyar

Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, and Waseda Institute for Advanced Study,  Waseda University 1-6-1 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku,Tokyo 169-8050, Japane-mail: tezduyar@rice.edu Mechanical Engineering,  Rice University, MS 321, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005

J. Appl. Mech 79(1), 010907 (Dec 13, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005070 History: Received February 16, 2011; Revised May 20, 2011; Published December 13, 2011; Online December 13, 2011

Even though computer modeling of spacecraft parachutes involves a number of numerical challenges, advanced techniques developed in recent years for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling in general and for parachute FSI modeling specifically have made simulation-based design studies possible. In this paper we focus on such studies for a single main parachute to be used with the Orion spacecraft. Although these large parachutes are typically used in clusters of two or three parachutes, studies for a single parachute can still provide valuable information for performance analysis and design and can be rather extensive. The major challenges in computer modeling of a single spacecraft parachute are the FSI between the air and the parachute canopy and the geometric complexities created by the construction of the parachute from “rings” and “sails” with hundreds of gaps and slits. The Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling has successfully addressed the computational challenges related to the FSI and geometric complexities, and has also been devising special procedures as needed for specific design parameter studies. In this paper we present parametric studies based on the suspension line length, canopy loading, and the length of the overinflation control line.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Parachute configurations with suspension line length ratios of 1.00, 1.15, 1.30, 1.44, 1.60, and 1.76

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Figure 2

Projected area for different SL/Do

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Figure 3

Drag coefficients for different SL/Do

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Figure 4

Definition of lift and drag vectors (from two different views) used in determining L/D of the parachute. Drag is the component of canopy force in the direction of the relative wind. Lift is the component of canopy force that is orthogonal to the relative wind vector in the plane formed by the relative wind vector and the parachute axis.

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Figure 5

Parachute skirt diameter for different Wp/So

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Figure 6

Time-averaged parachute shape for different Wp/So

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Figure 7

Example of sample locations used in determining the average shapes presented in Fig. 6

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Figure 8

Drag coefficients for different Wp/So

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Figure 9

Lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) for different Wp/So

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Figure 10

Skirt diameter for different SL/Do and OICL combinations

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Figure 11

Payload descent speed (with the swinging component removed) for different SL/Do and OICL combinations

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Figure 12

Payload total speed (with the swinging component removed) for different SL/Do and OICL combinations

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Figure 13

Lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) for different SL/Do and OICL combinations

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Figure 14

Skirt diameter for baselineSL/Do, 76 ft OICL and Wp/So = 0.650

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Figure 15

Payload descent speed (with the swinging component removed) for baselineSL/Do, 76 ft OICL and Wp/So = 0.650

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Figure 16

Payload total speed (with the swinging component removed) for baselineSL/Do, 76 ft OICL and Wp/So = 0.650

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Figure 17

Lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) for baselineSL/Do, 76 ft OICL and Wp/So = 0.650

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