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Special Section: Computational Fluid Mechanics and Fluid–Structure Interaction

Free-Surface Flow and Fluid-Object Interaction Modeling With Emphasis on Ship Hydrodynamics

[+] Author and Article Information
I. Akkerman

Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6133; USA and Department of Structural Engineering,  University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093iakkerman@ucsd.edu

Y. Bazilevs

Department of Structural Engineering,  University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093jbazilevs@ucsd.edu

D. J. Benson

Department of Structural Engineering,  University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093

M. W. Farthing, C. E. Kees

Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6133

J. Appl. Mech 79(1), 010905 (Dec 13, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005072 History: Received March 22, 2011; Revised May 15, 2011; Published December 13, 2011; Online December 13, 2011

This paper presents our approach for the computation of free-surface/rigid-body interaction phenomena with emphasis on ship hydrodynamics. We adopt the level set approach to capture the free-surface. The rigid body is described using six-degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An interface-tracking method is used to handle the interface between the moving rigid body and the fluid domain. An Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian version of the residual-based variational multiscale formulation for the Navier–Stokes and level set equations is employed in order to accommodate the fluid domain motion. The free-surface/rigid body problem is formulated and solved in a fully coupled fashion. The numerical results illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The fluid spatial domain decomposed into the water and air subdomains denoted by Ωtw and Ωta, respectively. The air-water interface is denoted by Γtaw.

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Figure 2

Dam break with obstacle. Problem setup.

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Figure 3

Dam break with obstacle. Snapshots of the water subdomain colored by the fluid speed at t = 2.0 s. Top: solution without penalty. Bottom: solution with λpen  = 1.

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Figure 4

Dam break with obstacle. Time series of the pressure at four locations on the obstacle (see Fig. 2). Very close correlation with experimental data is obtained.

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Figure 5

Dam break with obstacle. Snapshots of the water subdomain colored by the fluid speed at t = 12.5 s. Top: fully coupled simulation. Bottom: staggered simulation. For the chosen time step size, the coupled simulation produces a physical, near steady-state result, while the staggered approach gives unphysical, large-magnitude sloshing.

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Figure 6

DTMB 5415 in head sea. Snapshots of the ship negotiating high-amplitude waves. The water surface is colored by the fluid speed.

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Figure 7

DTMB 5415 in head sea. Time history of ship motion.

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Figure 8

DTMB 5415 in head sea. Time history of forces and moments acting on the ship.

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