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Special Section: Computational Fluid Mechanics and Fluid–Structure Interaction

Computer Modeling of Wave-Energy Air Turbines With the SUPG/PSPG Formulation and Discontinuity-Capturing Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Corsini, F. Rispoli

 Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospazialem, Sapienza University of Romem, Via Eudossiana, 18, I-00184 Rome, Italy

T. E. Tezduyar

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rice University, MS 321, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 tezduyar@rice.edu

J. Appl. Mech 79(1), 010910 (Dec 13, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005060 History: Received May 12, 2011; Revised June 26, 2011; Published December 13, 2011; Online December 13, 2011

We present a computational fluid mechanics technique for modeling of wave-energy air turbines, specifically the Wells turbine. In this type of energy conversion, the wave motion is converted to an oscillating airflow in a duct with the turbine. This is a self-rectifying turbine in the sense that it maintains the same direction of rotation as the airflow changes direction. The blades of the turbine are symmetrical, and here we consider straight and swept blades, both with constant chord. The turbulent flow physics involved in the complex, unsteady flow is governed by nonequilibrium behavior, and we use a stabilized formulation to address the related challenges in the context of RANS modeling. The formulation is based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and pressure-stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin methods, supplemented with the DRDJ stabilization. Judicious determination of the stabilization parameters involved is also a part of our computational technique and is described for each component of the stabilized formulation. We compare the numerical performance of the formulation with and without the DRDJ stabilization and present the computational results obtained for the two blade configurations with realistic airflow data.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Computational domain and mesh for the straight and swept blades, domains (left) and mesh near leading edge at the tip (right)

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Figure 2

Radial distribution of the axial velocity coefficient ϕ (r,t) during one wave period

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Figure 3

Isolines of static pressure coefficient on blade suction surface at Φ = 0.208, for the straight and swept blades

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Figure 4

Isosurfaces of normalized velocity magnitude (ϕ  = 0.15) on blade suction surface at Φ = 0.208, for the straight and swept blades

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Figure 5

Magnitude of the normalized velocity at four different sections in the blade wake at Φ = 0.208, for the straight and swept blades

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Figure 6

Normalized turbulent kinetic energy at four different sections in the blade wake at Φ = 0.208, for the straight and swept blades

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Figure 7

Streamlines for the straight and swept blades at Φ = 0.208 (top) and at Φ = 0.146 (bottom)

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Figure 8

Isosurfaces (Hn  =− 0.8) of normalized helicity for the straight and swept blades at Φ = 0.208 (top) and at Φ = 0.146 (bottom)

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