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Research Papers

Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Traveling Charge Gun Using Liquid Fuels

[+] Author and Article Information
Xin Lu1

School of Energy and Power Engineering,  Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China, 210094luxin@mail.njust.edu.cn

Yanhuang Zhou, Yonggang Yu

School of Energy and Power Engineering,  Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China, 210094

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 78(5), 051002 (Jul 27, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004292 History: Received November 14, 2010; Revised May 24, 2011; Published July 27, 2011; Online July 27, 2011

The traveling charge (TC) concept is theoretically capable of producing higher muzzle velocities without a large increase in maximum operating pressure, compared with the conventional charge. This work presents experimental and numerical studies on a 35 mm test gun system using liquid fuels as traveling charge. Eight firings with 2 different configurations of booster charge and traveling charge are performed in this paper. The firing experimental results indicate that the liquid traveling charge configuration performs better, in terms of increased muzzle velocity, than a conventional propellant charge by approximately 94 m/s, corresponding to about 8% velocity increase. A mathematical model for the two-phase flows in the 35 mm test gun system using liquid fuels as traveling charge is established and simulated by using the two-phase flow method and computational fluid dynamics technology. The mathematical model for the two-phase gas-dynamical processes consists of a system of first-order, nonlinear coupled partial differential equations. An adaptive grid generation algorithm is developed to account for the expansion of the computational domain due to the motion of the system’s payload in the tube. The numerical code is well validated by comparing its predictions with the experimental results. The calculated pressure-time profiles and projectile muzzle velocity are in good agreement with the experimental data. The numerical results show that the mathematical model developed gives the correct trend and can provide useful calculated parameters for the structural design of liquid traveling charge.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of the test gun system with liquid traveling charge

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Figure 2

A schematic diagram of the experimental fixture showing the general arrangement

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Figure 3

A set of pressure-time traces measured by the firing experiment of liquid traveling charge in a test gun system with 35 mm smooth-bore barrel

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Figure 4

Comparison of pressure-time curves between the conventional charge and the liquid traveling charge

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Figure 5

The comparison of pressure-time profiles between the theoretical calculation and the firing experiments

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Figure 6

Predicted pressure distribution for the liquid traveling charge

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Figure 7

Predicted pressure distribution for the conventional charge

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Figure 8

Predicted gas velocity distribution for the liquid traveling charge

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Figure 12

Predicted velocity-time profile of the projectile

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Figure 11

Predicted particle velocity distribution for the conventional charge

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Figure 10

Predicted particle velocity distribution for the liquid traveling charge

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Figure 9

Predicted gas velocity distribution for the conventional charge

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