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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Machining as a Wedge Indentation

[+] Author and Article Information
V. Madhavan

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 6720-0035

S. Chandrasekar

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907

T. N. Farris

School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907

J. Appl. Mech 67(1), 128-139 (Feb 23, 1998) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.321157 History: Received October 02, 1997; Revised February 23, 1998
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Variation of hydrostatic stress along the shear plane as given by Oxley et al. 11
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Etched cross section through the center of a conical indentation in mild steel showing deformation of texture lines (22). Note that the texture lines are not cut by the tip of the indenter.
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Etched cross section through a machining quick-stop specimen involving sticking between the chip and the rake face of the tool (29). The texture lines are curved around the cutting edge of the tool.
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Etched cross section of a machining quick-stop specimen involving sliding of the chip over the rake face (10). Note that the flow lines are cut by the cutting edge of the tool.
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Configuration of workpiece and tool for the finite element simulation of machining
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Strain-hardening characteristic of the work material
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Chip formation and distribution of equivalent plastic strain (μ=0.2)
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Chip formation and distribution of equivalent plastic strain (μ=0.8)
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Steady-state von Mises stress distribution. Hundred units of stress equals one MPa.  
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Steady-state distribution of σxx. Hundred units of stress equals one MPa.
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Steady-state distribution of σyy. Hundred units of stress equals one MPa.
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Steady-state distribution of σxy. Hundred units of stress equals one MPa.
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Schematic representation of the primary and secondary shear zones
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Schematic representation of stress distributions necessitated by different hypotheses for explaining chip curl

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