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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Yield Criterion for Porous Ductile Media at High Strain Rate

[+] Author and Article Information
Ze-Ping Wang, Qing Jiang

Department of Engineering Mechanics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0347

J. Appl. Mech 64(3), 503-509 (Sep 01, 1997) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2788921 History: Received July 17, 1995; Revised February 19, 1997; Online October 25, 2007

Abstract

An approximate yield criterion for porous ductile media at high strain rate is developed adopting energy principles. A new concept that the macroscopic stresses are composed of two parts, representing dynamic and quasi-static components, is proposed. It is found that the dynamic part of the macroscopic stresses controls the movement of the dynamic yield surface in stress space, while the quasi-static part determines the shape of the dynamic yield surface. The matrix material is idealized as rigid-perfectly plastic and obeying the von Mises yield. An approximate velocity field for the matrix is employed to derive the dynamic yield function. Numerical results show that the dynamic yield function is dependent not only on the rate of deformation but also on the distribution of initial micro-damage, which are different from that of the quasi-static condition. It is indicated that inertial effects play a very important role in the dynamic behavior of the yield function. However, it is also shown that when the rate of deformation is low (≤103 /sec), inertial effects become vanishingly small, and the dynamic yield function in this case reduces to the Gurson model.

Copyright © 1997 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Deformation , Stress , Shapes
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