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RESEARCH PAPERS

Dynamic Response of a Cylindrical Shell in a Potential Fluid

[+] Author and Article Information
G. E. Cummings

Nuclear Systems Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, Calif. 94550

H. Brandt

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616

J. Appl. Mech 46(4), 772-778 (Dec 01, 1979) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3424652 History: Received October 01, 1978; Revised April 01, 1979; Online July 12, 2010

Abstract

A numerical solution technique is presented for determining the dynamic response of a thin, elastic, circular, cylindrical shell of constant wall thickness and density, in a potential fluid. The shell may be excited by any radial forcing function with a specified time history and spatial distribution. In addition, a pressure history may be specified over a segment of the fluid outer boundary. Any of the natural shell end conditions may be prescribed. The numerical results are compared to experimental results for a 1/12-scale model of a nuclear-reactor core-support barrel. Natural frequencies and modes are determined for this model in air, water, and oil. The computed frequencies are within 15 percent of experimental results. A sample application compares the numerical technique to an analytical solution for shell beam modes. The comparison resolves an uncertainty concerning the proper effective mass to use in the analytical technique.

Copyright © 1979 by ASME
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